Grain News

  • Marketing 202

    Join us as we take the next step in our grain marketing journey.  We will review the basics of grain marketing as well as take a more in-depth look at options and compass contracts.  Click here for more details.

    WHEN:    Tuesday, February 20
    WHERE:  CHS
    23142 Hwy 74
    St. Charles, MN 55972

    TIME:       9:00 am

    RSVP to your local grain merchandiser:

    Aaron Ulland in Kasson at 507-634-7545 ext. 7
    Jared Schaefer in Ostrander at 507-657-2234
    Ken Garness in Kasson at 507-634-7545 ext 7

  • CHS Average Price Contract

    Announcing CHS Average Price Contract for 2018

    Diversify your marketing strategy with CHS average pricing.  Daily pricing for old crop futures will begin March 1 and end June 15.  Daily pricing for new crop futures will begin March 1 and end August 31.  Click Here for more details.  Sign up is open now through February 23.

    Contact your local CHS merchandiser for more information and to sign up:

    Aaron Ulland in Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext. 7

    Jared Schaefer in Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    Ken Garness in Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext. 7

  • Marketing 101: Back to the Basics

    MARKETING 101: BACK TO THE BASICS

    WHEN:
    TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12

    WHERE:
    CHS
    23142 HWY 74
    ST. CHARLES, MN 55972

    TIME:
    2:00 PM

    Join us for as we go back to the basics of grain marketing.  There will be a review of the basic terminology and key components of a successful risk management plan.  We will also dive into different contracting opportunities available to help achieve higher prices for the grain you work so hard to grow.

    Space is limited, so please RSVP to your local grain merchandiser.

    Aaron Ulland
    Kasson, MN
    507-634-7545 ext. 7

    Jared Schaefer
    Osterander, MN
    507-657-2234

    Ken Garness
    Kasson, MN
    507-634-7545 ext. 7

     

  • CHS Pro Advantage Enrollment

    Announcing CHS PRO ADVANTAGE for the 2018 and 2019 crop years

    Take the emotion out of selling some of your grain.  Take advantage of professional pricing of a portion of your crop.  Enrollment is open now for the 2018 and 2019 crop years.  Contracts options include: One-year corn and soybeans; Two-year corn and soybeans; as well as old crop (July contract) corn and soybeans.  Click Here for more details.

    Contact your local CHS merchandiser for more information and to sign up:

    Aaron Ulland in Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext. 7

    Jared Schaefer in Ostrander: 507-657-2234

     

  • Grain Market Update 9.13.17

    Market Snapshot:

    For those of you who haven’t seen the numbers, Tuesday’s USDA report was surprisingly bearish, yet again.  Yields and production for both corn and soybeans were raised again this month.  Just like last month, the market was expecting a friendly report with lower yields based on less than stellar crop conditions.  Unfortunately, with the market caught leaning the wrong way, we saw a rather dramatic collapse after the report.  At the end of the day, both commodities managed to recover some of the initial loses with corn closing down six and beans down nine.  One of the key points from the report yesterday, the USDA numbers may not be right now but the potential for corn yield to drop dramatically, is diminishing.  Until a new source or huge increase in demand shows up, corn prices are going to struggle.

    Harvest is starting to progress through the corn belt with some local activity reported in isolated areas.  In our trade territory it seems beans are anywhere from 10 days to three weeks away from maturity.  Corn will need all the time it can have to finish.  This week’s heat should help the process immensely.  So far the end users have not shown any signs of being concerned over a late harvest start.  Bean plants are still showing a mild inverse for quick ship bushels, but nothing as dramatic as seen in years past.  The bigger carries are shown from October to November at the river terminals.  If you have the ability to hold beans for even a couple of weeks until corn harvest starts, at this point it appears the market will compensate you for the extra handle.  The ethanol plants are still showing significant carry from spot delivery to October.

      9/12/17 Pre-report range of estimates Previous Estimate Change Market Impact
    Corn Production (bil bu.) 14.184 13.878 – 14.249 14.153 + 31 million BEARISH
    Corn Yield (bu/ac) 169.9 166.7 – 170.9 169.5 + 0.04 BEARISH
    Bean Production (bil bu.) 4.431 4.179 – 4.417 4.307 + 124 million BEARISH
    Bean Yield (bu/ac) 49.9 47.1 – 49.8 49.4 + 0.05 BEARISH

    Read Full Market Update

     

    Aaron D. Ulland

     

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

  • Grain Market Recap 9.11.17

    Market Snapshot:

    Mixed trade to start the week.  Corn was fractionally higher while beans settled down two cents.  The market is waiting with bated breath for tomorrow’s USDA monthly Crop Production and Supply & Demand reports.  The market is looking for lower yields in both corn and beans.  Traditionally the September report wouldn’t be considered a major report, however with the surprising yields reported in August, there may be more attention paid to the numbers tomorrow than normal.  Look for sideways trade until the numbers are released.  Post-report, the market will initially trade the number as printed, but it won’t take long for the market to realize we need more concert yield evidence to determine price direction going forward.  With the Corn Belt weather fairly conducive to finishing the crop, we may not have to wait long, combines are already rumored to be running in southern Illinois.  As the rigs, and yield reports, creep north, we will start to have a better handle on what we will have to work with for the next twelve months.

    With harvest in sight, basis values are starting to trend toward new crop values.  In the case of corn, the trend is actually showing slightly firmer nearby bids in some areas.  Beans are showing the opposite, with stronger nearby bids weakening to eventually match new crop values.

    Looking ahead, ProAdvantage contracts will be completed this Friday.  If you haven’t already locked a basis value for those futures, there is still time.  Depending on your cash needs, it may also be beneficial to roll the futures to July of next year while the carry is still at or near $0.26.  This roll can be locked in even before the Friday completion of the ProAdvantage contract.  Give us a call if you would like to set some price or roll targets.  We can also get started with bushels for next year as well.

    Crop Production released 9/12/17 Average Guess Pre-report range of estimates Previous Estimate
    Corn Production (bil bu.) 14.035 13.878 – 14.249 14.153
    Corn Yield (bu/ac) 168.2 166.7 – 170.9 169.5
    Bean Production (bil bu.) 4.328 4.179 – 4.417 4.381
    Bean Yield (bu/ac) 48.8 47.1 – 49.8 49.4

     

    Aaron D. Ulland

    Read Full Market Update

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

  • Grain Market Recap 9.1.17

    Market Snapshot:

    Mixed markets to start the new month and new market year.  Corn had a solid performance on Thursday but failed to follow through today.  One year ago yesterday, 8/31/16 was the low for December corn which provided just enough chatter and just enough of a reason for a short-covering rally.  Whether or not the lows from yesterday hold remains to be seen.  There is a long way to go before we get deep into harvest and have a solid feel for production potential.  Beans were able to rally to end the week, closing higher for the third week in a row.  New export sales announced this helped support the market.

    Going forward, the market is still trying to estimate production potential in the US for this year.  Some private analysts have started releasing their yield guesses this week, ahead of the USDA on September 12.  If you remember, the USDA last gave us a 169.5 corn yield but the market has generally been trading something closer to 166 to 167.  The first look this week showed a range of 166.7 to 169.2.  Some are starting to think the Feds might not be too far off which could limit the upside potential on corn.  Bean estimates have also slowly increased with some estimates coming in better than 49 bushels per acre.  While this would probably pressure the markets as well, demand has been steady enough to give the market some hope.

    Further confounding the grain markets are some very early looks at the acreage mix for 2018.  Here in the US one survey shows intended corn acres to be up something close two million acres while bean acres are projected to drop roughly the same.  The first look at South American acreage shows bean acreage will likely drop as well.  Yes, these are very EARLY estimates and are very likely to change between now and then, but they are factors to keep in mind as we evaluate marketing opportunities for both old and new crop.

    Beyond the board, basis values have continued to very slowly improve.  The dramatic drop in futures through the last half of August brought cash selling to a hard stop.  As a result end-users were forced to slowly improve basis to keep grain moving and maintain ownership for production.  Supplies are still are plentiful nearby, keeping a significant carry in the market from old crop to new crop.  This is something to keep in mind for those who still have old crop grain left to unpriced.  With our harvest seemingly two to three weeks behind normal, there could be opportunity to contract old crop grain for early October shipment at new crop prices.  Of course, this opportunity could be short lived, and some nearby bids could even improve enough eliminate that carry.  Be alert and ready to pull the trigger for the right opportunity.

     

    Aaron D. Ulland

    Read Full Market Update

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

  • CHS Grain Market Recap 8.30.17

    Market Snapshot:

    Another day lower in grain markets.  Traders and producers alike are waiting and hoping we are nearing a bottom in prices.  With the exception of Hurricane Harvey, a majority of the US growing regions are enjoying benign weather to help crop development.  There is some concern about the lack of heat to help the crops finish maturing in the coming weeks.  However, the market will continue to trade USDA yields until they are proven wrong, which is not likely to happen for more than a month.  A bear market, such as the one we seem to be in, tends to be slow to alter course.

    Consider this… Recently, prices have been trending lower, with little sign of improvement.  The funds have continued to sell commodities with their estimated position thought to be net short.  Looking at charts, it also seems this market is thin, oversold and due for some kind of bounce.  The big question is when and how much.  If you have old crop grain left to sell, consider taking advantage any price strength.  With new crop, there is a case to be made for being patient to see what yields truly develop as we get further into harvest across a broader production area.  At the same time however, any strength in new crop should not be ignored either.  One option would be a minimum price contract, which would set the cash price for your grain but still keep you open to upside.  With this contract, be sure to manage the call and put in a target to exit the option.

    Don’t keep wondering…  ASK A MERCHANDISER!

    Is it better to use a minimum price contract or cash plus at these low prices?

    The best route to take will depend on your personal market bias.  A minimum price contract will be best suited to the producer who might need cash now, but believes we are due for a significant futures rally.    For the producer who feels the market is not going to move much in the foreseeable future, a cash plus contract might be best.  One key with the cash plus contract is to pick an offer price that still makes sense in your marketing plan, and pay attention to which crop year you are working with on the firm offer.    Also keep in mind with the cash plus, you need to hold bushels off the market until you know for sure if the offer will fill.

    Aaron D. Ulland

    Read Full Market Update

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

  • CHS Grain Market Recap 8.28.17

    Market Snapshot:

    Farm Journal Midwest Crop tour completed last week failed to provide the friendly market input producers were hoping to see.  It seems many producers throughout the Midwest have gotten stung by backyard syndrome, confident their crop was no where as good as the USDA was predicting and even more confident the croup tour would verify this opinion.  Unfortunately, the Crop Tour seemed to verify the current USDA opinion, pressuring markets to life-of-contract lows.  When it was all said and done, the Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour came out with an estimated national corn yield of 167.1, roughly two bushels per acre better than the USDA, but also roughly two bushels per acre above the implied market consensus.  The Tour average bean yield came in at 48.5 bushels per acre, below the USDA.  The corn market didn’t take the results well and have traded lower for 8 of the last 10 sessions.  As for beans, the market seemed to take the information in stride.  In broad terms, the market is not confident in bean yield estimates this time of year, especially in light of the unseasonably cool weather we have seen recently.  One of the recurring themes last week throughout the Tour was lower pod counts in many areas.  Anecdotal evidence in our neck of the woods seems to verify lower pod counts along with the need for heat to help fill out the beans before harvest.

    On the basis front, most markets have softened corn basis.  The ethanol plants are able to source ample supplies simply by keeping the doors open.  Each day that goes by puts us one day closer to new crop and a potential space crunch.  Bean basis has improved in recent days, particularly at the processor level.  The steady demand for beans to be crushed for meal and oil is supportive to basis in the short term.  The bid structure is very quick-ship oriented with inverted markets to new crop.  The new crop basis values for both corn and beans have been mostly steady.

    Consider this… Before we get fully engulfed with harvesting this year’s crop, take some time to start thinking about next fall.  An easy way to take some of the emotion out of marketing your grain is to commit a portion of your production to CHS ProAdvantage.  Sign up for the program is coming up quick.  Don’t miss out on the opportunity while you are in the field, give us a call to walk through the ProAdvantage program details and get started.

    Aaron D. Ulland

    Read Full Market Update

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

  • Grain Market Recap 8.21.17

    Market Snapshot:

    Rain makes grain.  As simplistic as that sounds, that is the operating assumption futures traders right now.  Rainfall has been better than anticipated throughout  much of the Midwest over the past several days, leading to a substantially bearish mentality across the board.  While the rains have been good, the heat units are still lacking, but that is not yet being factored into prices.  Nearby September corn hit a new contract low today of $3.4650 before bouncing back ever so slightly.  Weekly crop progress report showed corn unchanged at 62% in the good and excellent categories.  Soybean conditions improved one point in the good and excellent categories this week.  Combined, this is likely to pressure both commodities more in the coming trade sessions.

    This week marks the annual Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour (formerly Pro Farmer.)  The market is hoping to hear lower yield reports come out throughout the week to at least slow the commodity sell off.   Snap shots from day one results, while less than impressive, were quite variable and failed to impact the markets much to start the week.

    Consider this… The falling board prices have helped widen the board carries to more attractive levels.  In other words, the market is telling us to there is no supply concerns and we should continue to hold our grain.  Now is the time to set targets for rolling new crop futures to next spring or summer for later shipment and capture those carries.  But what about those producers without on farm storage?  Take a look at the cash price for new crop versus next spring or summer.  Depending on the location there is a good chance the cash carry from new crop to April, for example, is more than enough to cover storage charges.  This is a good opportunity to consider your breakeven prices and cash needs to determine the right time and price to sell grain.  Even if the April, or spring price, isn’t quite where you need to be today, put in a sell offer so if the market turns around, your offer is ready.

     

    Read Full Market Update

    Kasson: 507-634-7545 ext 7
    Ostrander: 507-657-2234

    This Material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS and should be considered a solicitation.  The information contained in this presentation is taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but is not guaranteed by us as to accuracy or completeness and is sent to you for information purposes only.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.  CHS bases its recommendations solely on the judgment of CHS personnel.

© 2018 CHS Inc.